When the forest watches over water [fr]

In the middle of the desert in northern Kenya, the 16,000 hectares of the Marsabit forest are the county’s only permanent source of water. To protect this valuable resource, since 2012, AFD has been financing an integrated project to improve the management of the forest’s ecosystem led by Kenya Wildlife Service, in consultation with local communities.

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In the middle of the desert in northern Kenya, the 16,000 hectares of the Marsabit forest are the county’s only permanent source of water. Safeguarding this treasure is essential for the entire region.
In this arid region in northern Kenya, it is even said that elephants make sure they leave the forest during the rainy season to allow it to regenerate. However, the dependence of local communities on firewood, grazing land for cattle and water has led to a serious degradation of the ecosystem. The tree regeneration cycle, which is disrupted by urbanization, sedentary agriculture and climate change, has led to the loss of 1.6 hectares of vegetation a year. The primary forest, which attracts the mist in the air every morning to supply its water reserves, is consequently gradually disappearing.
To protect this valuable resource, since 2012, AFD has been financing an integrated project to improve the management of the forest’s ecosystem led by Kenya Wildlife Service, in consultation with local communities. This project involves, for example, proposing alternative water access points for residents and their livestock, outside the forest. The same goes for wild animals and nomad pastoral societies along the migration corridors, which are essential to the survival of the ecosystem. Once the forest has been relieved of this pressure, it will be able to regenerate and continue to fulfill its function as the region’s water tower.

Dernière modification : 26/03/2018

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